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  • Blood Pressure Quiz

  • Take the ten-question blood pressure IQ quiz below and then check your answers at the bottom of the page.


  • If you are concerned about your blood pressure, call your doctor or call 303-777-6877 for a referral.

     

    2012 Coronary Intervention 1. Which of the following is the most desirable blood pressure reading?

         a) 130 / 90

         b) 180 / 110

         c) 140 / 80

         d) Lower than 120 / 80

     

    2. The main cause of high blood pressure is:

         a) stress

         b) obesity

         c) unknown

         d) aging

     

    Accredited chest pain center in Colorado 3. Which of the following groups has the highest rate of high blood pressure?

         a) Caucasian

         b) African American

         c) Hispanic

         d) Asian/Pacific Islanders

     

    4. A person with high blood pressure:

         a) Has high cholesterol

         b) Has a high risk of stroke & heart attack

         c) Has a nervous condition

         d) May experience erratic heartbeats

     

    Coronary Intervention Excellence in Colorado 5. High blood pressure medication is usually prescribed to be taken:

         a) Under stressful situations

         b) As a lifelong way to manage high blood pressure

         c) When activities require physical exertion

         d) Whenever a patient feels bad

     

    6. Which of the following is more likely to contribute to your high blood pressure?

         a) Physical activity

         b) Salt/sodium intake

         c) High cholesterol level

         d) Ice cream

     

    Blood pressure & cardiac quiz 7. Major risk factors for heart disease and stroke (other than high blood pressure) include:

         a) High cholesterol

         b) Smoking

         c) Family history of heart disease

         d) All of the above

     

    8. Which of the following may be dangerous for people with high blood pressure?

         a) Physical activity

         b) Eggs

         c) Cold & flu medications

         d) Microwaves

     

    9. If you or a close blood relative has high blood pressure, you have a higher risk of stroke. Do you know which of these is a stroke warning sign?

         a) Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body

         b) Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding

         c) Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes

         d) Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination

         e) Sudden, severe headache with no known cause

     

    Cardiac care award Littleton, Colorado 10. I know my blood pressure numbers and what to do to keep my blood pressure in a healthy range.

         a) True

         b) False

     

  • Quiz Answers:

    1. Which of the following is the most desirable blood pressure reading?
      D:
       Lower than 120/80 mm HG is the most desirable reading in this list. The American Heart Association recommends this as optimal. 120-139/80-89 is considered hypertension. Systolic blood pressure of 140 or higher or diastolic pressure of 90 or higher is considered high and should be evaluated by a physician immediately. If your blood pressure is 140/90 or higher, you are at risk for stroke, heart attack and other complications from high blood pressure. Your health is your responsibility, so make sure you know your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, optimum weight, etc.) and take control to manage your risk factors for heart disease and stroke.

    2. The main cause of high blood pressure is:
      C:
      Unknown. In 90 to 95 percent of high blood pressure cases, the cause is unknown. In fact, you can have high blood pressure for years without knowing it. That is why it is called the "silent killer" - it creeps up on you. Even though doctors only rarely know what causes high blood pressure, you can take steps to control it and reduce your risk for stroke, heart disease and kidney disease. These steps include eating a low-sodium, low-saturated-fat diet, getting 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity on most or all days and limiting your alcohol intake. If these lifestyle changes do not get your blood pressure down to a normal level, your doctor may prescribe a blood-pressure-lowering medication.

    3. Which of the following groups has the highest rate of high blood pressure?
      B:
      African Americans. The rate of high blood pressure in African Americans in the United States is among the highest in the world. African Americans are at higher risk for this serious disease than whites and have higher prevalence rates than Mexican Americans and Asian/Pacific Islander adults. High blood pressure tends to be more common, happens at an earlier age and is more severe for many African Americans. Consequently, they have a higher risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure and kidney complications from high blood pressure.
    4. A person with high blood pressure:
      B:
      Has a high risk of stroke or heart attack. High blood pressure is a major modifiable risk factor for stroke, the number three killer and leading cause of severe, long-term disability in the United State. High blood pressure is also a key risk factor for heart attack.

    5. High blood pressure medication is usually prescribed to be taken:
      B:
      A lifelong way to manage high blood pressure. Blood pressure medication is a way to manage high blood pressure and is taken every day - not just under certain "conditions." High blood pressure is a lifelong disease. It can be controlled but not cured. If you doctor has prescribed medication for you, take it EXACTLY as prescribed for as long as the doctor tells you to take it. Decreasing dosage or not taking the medication at all is dangerous. If you change the dose or go off the medication at all is dangerous. If you change the dose or go off the medication, it won't be effective and your blood pressure will rise, putting you at risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure and kidney failure. Medication should be combined with lifestyle changes such as eating a low-saturated-fat, low-salt diet, maintaining a healthy weight, getting plenty of physical activity (30 - 60 minutes on most or all days of the week) and not using tobacco products.

    6. Which of the following is more likely to contribute to your high blood pressure?
      B: Salt/sodium intake. Some people are "salt sensitive," so eating a lot of salt (sodium) adds to their high blood pressure. Salt holds excess fluid in your body and puts an added burden on your heart. Recent evidence suggests that salt sensitivity can also be a very important determinant of future high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers have also found that having a particular gene may make African Americans much more salt sensitive, thus increasing their risk of developing high blood pressure. As little as one extra gram of salt (half a teaspoon) could raise blood pressure as much as five millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) in people who have this gene variant. It is important to cut down on your sodium intake, and sodium is everywhere - in canned foods, baking soda, cheese, dried fruits and even medications!

    7. Major risk factors for heart disease and stroke (other than high blood pressure) include:
      D:
      All of the above. You can also include lack of physical activity, diabetes, increasing age, being African American and being male in the list. Risk factors for heart disease and stroke amplify one another rather than just adding up. The more risk factors you have, the higher your risk of heart disease and stroke.

    8. Which of the following may be dangerous for people with high blood pressure?
      C:
      Cold and flu medicines. People with high blood pressure should be aware of the possible danger of taking certain cold, cough and flu medications. Decongestants have been reported to increase blood pressure and may interfere with blood pressure medications. If you are one of the 73 million adults who has high blood pressure, make sure to choose cold and flu medications that do not contain decongestants.

    9. If you or a close blood relative has high blood pressure, you have a higher risk of stroke. Do you know which of these is a stroke warning sign?
      1-5:
      These are all signs of a stroke and not to be taken lightly. If you or someone around you is having these symptoms, call 9-1-1 immediately. Stroke and heart attack are life-and-death emergencies - every second counts. Not all of these signs occur in every stroke. Sometimes they go away and return. If any occur, get help fast! Today new medications may stop strokes and heart attacks in progress, but to be effective, these drugs must be given relatively quickly after symptoms first appear. So do not delay - get help immediately if you are having symptoms.

    10. I know my blood pressure numbers and what to do to keep my blood pressure in a healthy range.
      A: If your answer is True, then you are eating a diet low in sodium and saturated fat, getting 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week and limiting your alcohol intake to no more than one drink a day for women and two drinks per day for men. If you have been prescribed medication, then you are taking it EXACTLY as the doctor recommended. If your answer is False, have your blood pressure checked by a physician. If you numbers are 120/80 or higher, you need to start working to manage your blood pressure.

    Source American Heart Association


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